Student Learning Outcomes

We embrace a common set of student learning outcomes and we are accountable for sustained measurement of these outcomes

Tarleton State University: Globalization & Diversity

Texas A&M University System Student Learning Outcome–Globalization & Diversity

Bold statement:

The Texas A&M University System delivers a common set/embraces a common view of important outcomes and is accountable for sustained measurement.

Institutional Effectiveness:

For all TAMU System universities, the rationale for assessing student learning outcomes (SLOs) originates primarily from efforts to maintain institutional effectiveness, which is defined as a process of identifying outcomes, assessing the extent to which they are achieved, and providing evidence of improvement based on their analysis.

GLOBALIZATION & DIVERSITY LEARNING OUTCOME:

Upon completion of their degree program, students will be able to analyze the impact of multiple factors on the interconnectedness of diverse peoples in the global environment.

Generic Descriptions of Campus Assessment Results:

EXEMPLARY
All criteria met and results exceed expectations with little room for improvement.

PROFICIENT
Most criteria met and results indicate mastery of objective with some room for improvement.

SUFFICIENT
Acceptable number of criteria met and results meet expectations with room for improvement.

EMERGING
Some criteria met and results indicate need for improvement.

INSUFFICIENT
Few criteria met; results indicate need for significant improvement or no/insufficient results reported to measure performance of objective.

UNIVERSITY

TSU

ASSESSMENT METHOD

Assessment of Globalization and Cultural Diversity was done on a program by program basis using a combination of embedded objective questions, written assignments, presentations, internship evaluations, portfolios, and other direct measures of student work. Subjective assessment methods were evaluated by two or more faculty members using program developed standardized rubrics or, in the case of internship reports, by a qualified outside evaluator.

Globalization and Cultural Diversity is also assessed using a combination of written assignments, presentations, internship evaluations, portfolios, and other direct measures of student work as part of Tarleton's Applied Learning Experiences academic assessment processes.

Globalization and Cultural Diversity is also assessed using a combination of embedded objective questions, written assignments, presentations, internship evaluations, portfolios, and other direct measures of student work in Tarleton’s General Education courses as part of Tarleton's General Education academic assessment processes.

Globalization and Cultural Diversity is also assessed indirectly using two national standardized survey instruments: the Your First College Year Survey and the National Survey of Student Engagement instrument.

RESULTS: 2015

This outcome was measured in the following two subareas of Tarleton's Undergraduate Learning Outcomes:
2.2.2 UG - Practice Good Citizenship: 100% of academic program assessments of subarea 2.2.2 met their targets.
2.2.5 UG -Respect Different Viewpoints and Cultures: 43% of academic program assessments of subarea 2.2.5 met their targets.

Globalization and Cultural Diversity is also assessed as part of Tarleton’s Applied Learning Experiences academic assessment process through the following student learning outcome: “Expand Global Perspective - Students will evaluate how the applied learning experience expanded their views of academic, political, social, cultural, and/or economic environments and prepared them to contribute more meaningfully to a global society.”

There are five types of Applied Learning Experiences (Internship/Practicum, Leadership, Undergraduate Research, Service Learning, and Study Abroad / Away). Each type of experience is directly assessed using a five point rubric that evaluates both students’ ‘global awareness’ and the understanding of the ‘larger implications’ of their academic and applied learning experiences.

The 2014-15 assessment results for the Applied Learning Experiences are:
Students participating in Internship / Practicum had a mean of 4.37 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.48 on ‘larger implications’.
Students participating in Leadership had a mean of 4.20 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.33 on ‘larger implications’.
Students participating in Undergraduate Research had a mean of 4.28 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.26 on ‘larger implications’.
Students participating in Service Learning had a mean of 4.12 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.18 on ‘larger implications’.
Students participating in Study Abroad / Away had a mean of 4.48 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.43 on ‘larger implications’.

Students participating in Service Learning had a mean of 4.12 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.18 on ‘larger implications’.
Students participating in Study Abroad / Away had a mean of 4.48 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.43 on ‘larger implications’. Globalization and Cultural Diversity is also assessed in core courses as part of Tarleton’s General Education academic assessment process through the following student learning outcome: “Global Perspectives - Students will demonstrate broad and multiple perspectives on the individual relationship to society and the world and demonstrate intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.” This is a new student learning outcome and we are in the the process of gathering our first complete cycle of baseline data.

The Your First College Year survey instrument indirectly assessed Globalization and Cultural Diversity using the construct Pluralistic Orientation which consisted of the following questions: a) Ability to work cooperatively with diverse people, b) Tolerance of others with difference beliefs, c) Openness to having my views challenged, d) Ability to discuss and negotiate controversial issues, e) Ability to see the world from someone else's perspective.
The 2014 survey results showed a mean of 50.0 (n=432) for the Pluralistic Orientation construct.

Recent administrations of the National Survey of Student Engagement included a question referencing how often a student's experience with the institution "included diverse perspectives (different races, religions, genders, political beliefs, etc.) in class discussions or writing assignments". This question is assessed on a four-point scale with 4 = very much, and 1 = very little. Results of the biennial assessment are displayed below. Mean values are displayed as combined, FTIC, and Senior level students.
2015: 2.65 2.40 2.90
2013: 2.39 2.22 2.53
2011: 2.54 2.40 2.63
2009: 2.73 2.63 2.80
2007: 2.60 2.59 2.61


The 2015 administration of the National Survey of Student Engagement included the question "how often did you engage in discussions with diverse others". This question had subareas addressing discussions with a) people from a race or ethnicity other than your own, b) people from an economic background other than your own, c) people with religious beliefs other than your own, and d) people with political views other than your own.

The 2015 survey results showed a mean of 41.1 (n=547) for the question "how often did you engage in discussions with diverse others".

ANALYSIS

The overall program data results shows that for the key 2.2.5 subarea, "respect different viewpoints and cultures", 13 programs have assessment measures associated with this student learning outcome, all of which reported data in 2014-15. For subarea 2.2.2, "practice good citizenship", two programs have assessment measures directly related to this subarea and one reported data in 2014-15.

The 2.2.2 subarea has a very small sample sizes (n is the number of measures with reported data in a given year as some programs have reported more than one measure). For 2.2.5, some programs met their targets on one campus location but not all campus locations. For the purposes of this data these measures were coded as not meeting their targets even though they met the targets on some campus locations. The percentage of academic program assessment that met their targets for the two cycles are:
2.2.2: 100% in 2014-2015 (n=2) and 100% in 2013-2014 (n=5)
2.2.5: 43% in 2014-2015 (n=14) and 58% in 2013-2014 (n=12)

These results indicate a clear need for improvement on the program level both in terms of the number of programs assessing these areas but also in student performance in the key subarea of "respect different cultures and viewpoints".

The results from the Applied Learning Experience assessments has shown a steady trend of success:

The two year trend of assessment results for the Applied Learning Experiences are:
2.2.2: 100% in 2014-2015 (n=2) and 100% in 2013-2014 (n=5)
2.2.5: 43% in 2014-2015 (n=14) and 58% in 2013-2014 (n=12)

These results indicate a clear need for improvement on the program level both in terms of the number of programs assessing these areas but also in student performance in the key subarea of "respect different cultures and viewpoints".

The results from the Applied Learning Experience assessments has shown a steady trend of success:

The two year trend of assessment results for the Applied Learning Experiences are: In 2014-15 Internship / Practicum students had a mean of 4.37 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.48 on ‘larger implications’. In 2013-14 these results were 4.70 and 4.60 respectively.

In 2014-15 Leadership students had a mean of 4.20 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.33 on ‘larger implications’. In 2013-14 these results were 4.38 and 4.38 respectively.

In 2014-15 Undergraduate Research students had a mean of 4.28 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.26 on ‘larger implications’. In 2013-14 these results were 4.29 and 4.35 respectively.

In 2014-15 Service Learning students had a mean of 4.12 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.18 on ‘larger implications’. In 2013-14 these results were 4.30 and 4.25 respectively.

In 2014-15 Study Abroad / Away students had a mean of 4.48 on ‘global awareness’ and 4.43 on ‘larger implications’. In 2013-14 these results were 4.86 and 4.86 respectively.

These results indicate that the Applied Learning Experiences program students are demonstrating consistent success in achieving the student learning outcomes related to Globalization and Cultural Diversity.

The results from the Your First College Year survey instrument show a need for improvement compared to our peer institutions.

Tarleton's 2014 survey results showed a mean of 50.0 (n=432) for the Pluralistic Orientation construct compared to a mean of 52.0 and 53.1 for Tarleton's comparison group 1 and 2 peer institutions.

These results indicate a need for improvement in this area. Tarleton's new General Education outcome alignment is expected to help improve results in this area.

The results from the National Survey of Student Engagement instrument show a mixed trend, with a low combined mean of 2.39 in 2013 and a high of 2.73 in 2009. This is an area that needs more consistent attention to provide students more consistent experiences in engaging with diverse perspectives.

Taken collectively, these results indicate this is an Emerging area for Tarleton.

ACTION

1) Disseminate and discuss data results with faculty and administration;

2.) Provide ongoing faculty development for implementation and assessment of Globalization and Cultural Diversity in both academic programs and student activity experiences;

3.) Monitor the development and availability of courses and experiences to ensure students have opportunities to build their Globalization and Cultural Diversity knowledge, values, and skills; and

4.) Monitor assessment reporting cycles to ensure that all academic programs and student activity programs assessing Globalization and Cultural Diversity are reporting data and linking their findings to the related Tarleton Undergraduate Learning Outcomes

5.) Encourage programs to explore opportunities to more centrally embedded these student learning outcomes into their curriculum.

Information by System Members
Texas A&M University
Prairie View A&M University
Tarleton State University
Texas A&M International University
Texas A&M University Corpus Christi
Texas A&M University Kingsville
West Texas A&M University
Texas A&M University Commerce
Texas A&M University Texarkana
Texas A&M University Central Texas
Texas A&M University San Antonio
Skip to toolbar