Student Learning Outcomes

We embrace a common set of student learning outcomes and we are accountable for sustained measurement of these outcomes

Texas A&M University: Integration

AMU System Student Learning Outcome–Integration of Broad Knowledge

Bold statement:

The Texas A&M University System delivers a common set/embraces a common view of important outcomes and is accountable for sustained measurement.

Institutional Effectiveness:

For all TAMU System universities, the rationale for assessing student learning outcomes (SLOs) originates primarily from efforts to maintain institutional effectiveness, which is defined as a process of identifying outcomes, assessing the extent to which they are achieved, and providing evidence of improvement based on their analysis.

Integration of Broad Knowledge Outcome:

Upon completion of their degree program, students will be able to synthesize knowledge from general and specialized studies.

Generic Descriptions of Campus Assessment Results:

EXEMPLARY
All criteria met and results exceed expectations with little room for improvement.

PROFICIENT
Most criteria met and results indicate mastery of objective with some room for improvement.

SUFFICIENT
Acceptable number of criteria met and results meet expectations with room for improvement.

EMERGING
Some criteria met and results indicate need for improvement.

INSUFFICIENT
Few criteria met; results indicate need for significant improvement or no/insufficient results reported to measure performance of objective.

UNIVERSITY

TAMU (incl. TAMUG and TAMUQ)

ASSESSMENT METHOD

Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP): Aggies Commit to Learning for a Lifetime – Freshmen and Senior Reflections from High Impact Learning Experiences (HILES) evaluated with Integrative and Lifelong Learning (modified) VALUE Rubric.

RESULTS: 2014

Sufficient: Seniors: Connections – 2.2/4, Transfer – 2.3/4, Reflection and Self Assessment – 2.5/4. Freshmen: Connections – 1.8/4, Transfer – 2/4, Reflection and Self Assessment – 2.2/4.

ANALYSIS

For each “Integration” category of the Aggies Commit rubric, Seniors scored higher than freshmen when reflecting on significant learning experiences. These results include participation from each college as well as branch campuses in Galveston and Qatar. Reflections were also analyzed in co-curricular experiences, comparing student leaders to general students (1.33/5 vs. 1.15/5).

ACTION

College/campus-specific reports were sent to each college and branch campus. Program improvements are the responsibility of each college and/or department. Moving forward, Texas A&M will use this data as baseline information for future planning of its QEP for 2018.

COMMENTS

Content-analysis of reflections also revealed approximately 1/2 of all reflections discussed integrative learning gains in the co-curricular (prompt was not specific).

UNIVERSITY

TAMU (incl. TAMUG and TAMUQ)

ASSESSMENT METHOD

Student workers in the Division of Student Affairs were given a pre-survey (September) and post-survey (April) about their learning on the job and its relationship to their academic work. Some students also were interviewed by their supervisors during the year.

RESULTS: 2014

Proficient to exemplary: the pre-mean to post-mean for each question increased .o8 to .24 (on a 5-point scale), depending on the question. The post means ranged from 3.39 to 4.32 on a 5-point scale.

ANALYSIS

Students were asked about their job in relation to several outcomes: working with a variety of people, conflict resolution, written communication, time management, oral communication, and critical thinking. Students were also asked about their recognition of connections between their job and their academic work, career options, and full-time employment. Qualitatively, the post-survey students were better able to articulate how they have applied their coursework to their job and vice versa. Students articulated what skills they learned that make them successful at Texas A&M.

ACTION

For some students, particularly in more technical fields, making the connections were more difficult, especially as seen in the pre-survey. Students who had the opportunity to reflect with their supervisors were helped to make connections as well. In 2014-2015, the Division will provide more training to supervisors about helping students make connections.

Information by System Members
Texas A&M University
Prairie View A&M University
Tarleton State University
Texas A&M International University
Texas A&M University Corpus Christi
Texas A&M University Kingsville
West Texas A&M University
Texas A&M University Commerce
Texas A&M University Texarkana
Texas A&M University Central Texas
Texas A&M University San Antonio
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